Review by Susan Orosco

The Last Garden by Jorge E. Ancheytta takes place in a remote mountain hideaway where Heidi, her brother Checo and their cousin Coco live with some of the last humans on earth.  Their world was destroyed long ago by the shadow, and only a few survived.  But when Heidi’s and Checo’s father crosses over to the dark side the trio is called upon to find and rescue him. 

They learn that their father possesses the key to the mystery of the world’s destruction and possibly answers to their future.  Armed with three instruments endowed with special powers, Heidi, Checo and Coco bravely descend to the dark side, not knowing what they will see and whom they will meet.  Joined by Koby, a dark side inhabitant who is on their side, the teens seek both the man and the truth. 

What they discover on their adventurous journey is far from what they expect, and they soon find themselves faced with the task of saving both their own lives and the lives of those they love.

The lastGarden

A short description of this book would be – The X-Men meets Harry Potter. It is an amazing first book of a trilogy. It is a colorful adventure story aimed at the young adult audience.

It takes place in the mountains of Pasadena after what appears to be an attack by a dark force. It is later called ‘The Shadow’. For planet earth it is the end of the world. The Shadow devours 90% of earth when this story unfolds.

It is centered on three teenage characters, Heidi, her bother Checo and their cousin Coco. They are each armed with a powerful weapon that takes them on a dangerous journey. They are compelled to defeat The Shadow. It is their mission to save Heidi’s father who has mysteriously crossed from the light side of life to the darkness where The Shadow resides.

The adventure is filled with amazing characters, imagination and magic. This first book ends as the battle begins. This book is especially designed for the young adult audience who is in need of more magic, adventure and a hint of romance.

I would venture to say this book is also a great fit for film and possibly stage.