“The Conjuring” Will Lure Heaviest Percentage of Moviegoers: Latinos!

In Theaters July 9th

Why aren’t Latinos cast in horror films when they are among the biggest fans of this genre?

 The Conjuring 1

There’s a new summer horror flick opening up on July 19th and the Latino community is anxious to flood the theaters. Latinos love horror on the big and little screens. No doubt, Latinos will once again prove their purchase power as they contribute a solid 15 percent of the box-office revenue to watch Warner Bros.The Conjuring.

So with these stats… why aren’t more Latinos being cast in horror films? We’ll tackle and explore  this question in another article we’ll be writing soon.

The Conjuring is based on the true life story set in 1970 that tells the tale of how world renowned paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren were called upon to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in a secluded farmhouse. Before there was Amityville, there was Harrisville.

Forced to confront a powerful demonic entity, the Warrens find themselves caught in the most horrifying case of their lives.

From New Line Cinema comes a feature film drawn from the case files of married demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren. The Conjuring stars Academy Award® nominee Vera Farmiga (Up in the Air, TV’s Bates Motel) and Patrick Wilson (Insidious) as the Warrens, and Ron Livingston (The Odd Life of Timothy Green) and Lili Taylor (TV’s Hemlock Grove) as Roger and Carolyn Perron, residents of the house.

Joey King, Shanley Caswell, Haley McFarland, Mackenzie Foy and newcomer Kyla Deaver play the Perrons’ five daughters, and Sterling Jerins is the Warrens’ little girl, Judy. Rounding out the cast are Marion Guyot as Judy’s grandmother; Steve Coulter as Father Gordan, Shannon Kook as the Warren’s investigative assistant, Drew; and John Brotherton as the local law enforcement official skeptical of the Perron’s claims and the Warrens’ tactics.

Latinos Represent 18% of Movie-going Population

The Conjuring is scary, spooky and with James Wan (Saw, Insidious) directing, there is little doubt this film will reveal the real horrors lurking within a secluded centuries-old farmhouse in the seemingly peaceful countryside of Harrisville, Rhode Island. The house, which in itself is its own character, was bought in 1970 by Carolyn and Roger Perron and the couple and their five daughters find themselves directly in the path of extreme, yet indefinable, danger. When Ed and Lorraine meet the family and the unnatural enemy waging war against them, they know they are in for the battle of their career… and lives.

James Wan (Saw, Insidious) directs from a screenplay by Chad Hayes & Carey W. Hayes (The Reaping). “James is a master at crafting a psychological ghost story with lighting and cameras,” commented John R. Leonetti, director of photography.

“The overall trend is that Hispanics remain the best movie-going customers,” said Ray Ydoyaga, an executive at Nielsen, who helped put together the analytics company’s annual 2012 American Moviegoing report.  “I think by and large that studios understand that Hispanics are one of their most important customers.”

People love a story that can make them scream, either from a thrill, or out of fear… “Especially when that lingering effect follows them from the theatre. And since this is a real-life story, I think knowing that evil spirits actually exists is as scary as it gets,” said Wan.

The Conjuring – Opens July 19, 2013
Director: James Wan
Executive Producers: Walter Hamada, Dave Neustadter
Producers: Tony DeRosa-Grund, Peter Safran and Rob Cowan
Director of Photography: John R. Leonetti
Composer: Joseph Bishara

eesparza

Elia Esparza is a leading expert in communications and journalism targeting the burgeoning Hispanic market and has produced and written dozens of articles. President and CEO of Always Evolving PR and a Communications Specialist, Elia, incorporates her 18 years experience in the areas of entertainment and education public relations, and marketing. promotions, market research and translations (Eng/Span).